Speakers

Amy Vickers


Amy Vickers & Associates, Inc.



Look for me at the following events:    

Sessions
Thursday, October 3 (3:35pm - 4:05pm)
(T-1948) Legalized Marijuana: Water-Efficient Weed Can be More than a Pipe Dream

Description
The legalization of medicinal and recreational cannabis is one of the fastest growing industries in the United States, both in the industrial and agricultural sectors, and so are its water and energy demands. While industry wide data are limited, estimates indicate that outdoor pot plants use about 2 to 6 gallons per day, and indoor operations use about 3 to 8 gallons of water per KW of lighting, and about 0.6 KW to 1 KW per 25 ft2 of plant canopy. Whether grown in a field, greenhouse, or in small pots, strategic irrigation, careful cultivation, water reuse, and other efficiency steps can significantly reduce weed's water demands and evaporative losses while also saving energy and chemicals. From Massachusetts to California, today more than a dozen states allow the production of legal marijuana, a fact that has spawned thousands of large and small growing operations that are contributing to rising water demands. Yet little is understood how these facilities and their water, energy, fertilizer, pesticide, herbicide and other chemical requirements are affecting local water supplies, water quality, pollution runoff, wastewater flows, energy, and the environment. And as more states act to legalize pot, what are the national water demand and environmental implications of America's growing demand for marijuana? This paper will take you inside a working cannabis growing and processing facility and show step-by-step its water, energy and chemical requirements along with its environmental impacts. The latest in water and energy efficiency measures, some of which can reduce cannabis water demands by over 70%, including emerging marijuana water efficiency standards and certification requirements, will also be reviewed. Lastly, the water policy implications of pot production in water-short regions and urban areas with limited water supplies will also be discussed.



Sessions
Wednesday, October 2 (3:15pm - 3:45pm)
(W-1919) Water Conservation: Our Past, Present, and Future

Description
Gone are the days when water utilities and consumers could easily access quick water savings simply by replacing an old water-guzzling toilet. The water conservation field has changed significantly and become more complex, buoyed by its many innovations and successes. Today, water suppliers and the water efficiency industry have a wealth of institutional knowledge thanks to seasoned professionals who have devoted their lives to saving water and who have seen major changes occur in real time. The water sector is also experiencing an influx of enthusiastic early-career conservation professionals who bring fresh perspectives to the table. Each of these groups has a great deal to learn from the other, but it is difficult to find time for sweeping, intergenerational conversations in the course of day-to-day work.

This panel takes advantage of the annual WSI gathering to unite 4-6 panelists representing early-, mid-, and late-career professionals. Panelists will discuss their motivations for pursuing water conservation careers, their lessons learned, industry stories, and visions for the future. This panel will present a unique diversity of perspectives on where water conservation has been, where it is, and most importantly, where it needs to go.




Sessions
Wednesday, October 2 (3:55pm - 4:25pm)
(W-1927) Water Conservation: Our Past, Present, and Future

Description
Gone are the days when water utilities and consumers could easily access quick water savings simply by replacing an old water-guzzling toilet. The water conservation field has changed significantly and become more complex, buoyed by its many innovations and successes. Today, water suppliers and the water efficiency industry have a wealth of institutional knowledge thanks to seasoned professionals who have devoted their lives to saving water and who have seen major changes occur in real time. The water sector is also experiencing an influx of enthusiastic early-career conservation professionals who bring fresh perspectives to the table. Each of these groups has a great deal to learn from the other, but it is difficult to find time for sweeping, intergenerational conversations in the course of day-to-day work.

This panel takes advantage of the annual WSI gathering to unite 4-6 panelists representing early-, mid-, and late-career professionals. Panelists will discuss their motivations for pursuing water conservation careers, their lessons learned, industry stories, and visions for the future. This panel will present a unique diversity of perspectives on where water conservation has been, where it is, and most importantly, where it needs to go.




Sessions
Wednesday, October 2 (4:35pm - 5:05pm)
(W-1935) Water Conservation: Our Past, Present, and Future

Description
Gone are the days when water utilities and consumers could easily access quick water savings simply by replacing an old water-guzzling toilet. The water conservation field has changed significantly and become more complex, buoyed by its many innovations and successes. Today, water suppliers and the water efficiency industry have a wealth of institutional knowledge thanks to seasoned professionals who have devoted their lives to saving water and who have seen major changes occur in real time. The water sector is also experiencing an influx of enthusiastic early-career conservation professionals who bring fresh perspectives to the table. Each of these groups has a great deal to learn from the other, but it is difficult to find time for sweeping, intergenerational conversations in the course of day-to-day work.

This panel takes advantage of the annual WSI gathering to unite 4-6 panelists representing early-, mid-, and late-career professionals. Panelists will discuss their motivations for pursuing water conservation careers, their lessons learned, industry stories, and visions for the future. This panel will present a unique diversity of perspectives on where water conservation has been, where it is, and most importantly, where it needs to go.



2019 Sponsors

2019 Partners & Agency Supporters

About the Conference

The 12th annual WaterSmart Innovations Conference and Exposition, Oct. 2-3, 2019, in Las Vegas, is a premier venue to showcase new water-efficiency technology; build and strengthen effective, interdisciplinary relationships; and establish your company as an international leader in innovative water efficiency technology and services.


e-Newsletter

   

Tweets by @WSIConfExpo

Contact Us

Back to Top